Tag Archives: scientist

Point of View

Following a comment yesterday from Gabriela Blandy, today I’m playing with points of view. Here is the same story presented in two different styles: the first with as many points of view as possible, the second with just one. Please let me know in the comments which you think works best, and why.

– – –

“The winner is… Professor Wilbur Ibek!”

The crowd roared its appreciation. Many leapt to their feet, hands clapping a hailstorm of enthusiasm. Cheers erupted all around.

Professor Ibek stood awkwardly. He began to walk up the aisle to the podium, ears deafened by the applause, mind reeling from the announcement.

His son, Stephen, felt a lump in his throat. The toil, the stress, the risk – it had come to this. It had payed off. He caught the eye of his mother, Maria.

Maria, scientist herself, but also ex-wife, was crying. It had not been a happy marriage, there was much to regret. The work had taken its toll. But at least there was this moment for the family of three.

The professor walked past Duncan Mayhew. Mayhew saw his rival soaking in the adulation of the masses, and he felt his blood boil. Just two more months, a few thousand dollars and another publication and the award would have been his. What now? Obscurity?

Susanna Laven, journalist, sat on the edge of her seat. Either way, she would have the front page tomorrow. Her career was made.

Professor Ibek climbed unsteadily up to the podium and faced the audience. The applause continued for a moment, then abated and an expectant silence fell.

Ibek fought back tears and cleared his throat. His life flashed through his mind. He wondered: How did I become this? How did I get here?

He cleared his throat again.

“I’m sorry,” he said. “I lied.”

– – –

As if in a dream, he heard the announcer say: “The winner is… Professor Wilbur Ibek!”

Around him, the crowd roared its appreciation. Many leapt to their feet, hands clapping a hailstorm of enthusiasm.

He stood awkwardly. With ears deafened by the applause and mind reeling, he began to walk up the aisle to the podium.

He saw his son, Stephen, in the crowd. What he had put him through – toil, stress, risk – it had come to this. Had it payed off?

He caught sight of his ex-wife, Maria. She was crying. It had not been a happy marriage, there was much to regret. The work had taken its toll. But at least there was this moment for the family of three.

He walked past his rival, Duncan Mayhew. He saw a forced smile upon Mayhew’s lips. The poor guy must be raging inside.

He saw that journalist – Susanna something? Boy, would she have the front page tomorrow. Her career was made.

Ibek climbed unsteadily up to the podium and faced the audience. The applause continued for a moment, then abated and an expectant silence fell.

He fought back tears and cleared his throat. His life flashed through his mind. He wondered: How did I become this? How did I get here?

He cleared his throat again.

“I’m sorry,” he said. “I lied.”

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